Branch Line

I think it’s time that Junction Ten developed a branch line.

I love to make patchwork quilts and, a few years ago I was commissioned to make a quilt as a wedding gift. About 2 years ago it happened again and I would like to share the result with you.

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When you look at the finished product you could be forgiven for thinking that they are quick to make – let me enlighten you.

After initial discussions about colour and pattern with the recipient, I went home to sketch out the design and calculate the amount of each colour fabric that would be required. It then took me nearly 17 months to find all the fabrics. Purple is not an easy colour to co-ordinate and, what appears as purple to one person is not the same colour to another! I had enough of two of the fabrics in my stash and I found two more dark fabrics fairly easily but, the light coloured fabric, which had to be fawn/beige with something small and purple printed on it proved elusive until we went to Horsham on a completely unrelated visit.

The pattern is called Log Cabin and it is a traditional pattern and there are many different arrangements for the blocks. Each block is half light and half dark, representing the light and shadow from the fire. The quilt is made up of 64 blocks, each 10.5 inches square. I make no apologies for working in inches, all my measuring equipment is in inches and I see no point in renewing it all just to satisfy the metrication police!

IMG_5277  IMG_5278

Cutting the fabric is time consuming in as much as accuracy is required. Seam allowances are included when cutting but they are not marked, they are sewn by eye using part of the foot on my sewing machine to give an accurate seam. I usually cut and piece about 16 blocks at a time, after this my eyes and fingers get a little tired and that is when mistakes creep in. Once all the blocks are completed you can lay out the final design referring to the initial sketch if necessary. The blocks are then sewn together to make rows and the rows sewn together to produce the finished quilt top.

Finally the three layers, backing, wadding (the fluffy bit in the middle) and top are sandwiched to form the patchwork quilt. This is embellished with a sewn design that holds all three layers together. Finally the quilt has binding attached to all the way around to give it a nice finish.

Et voila! An heirloom is created. IMG_7277

I will be putting up other creations over the next few months, some of which will feature photographs printed on fabric. Keep checking out the site, there will be something for everyone.

Gina

One thought on “Branch Line

  1. I am now the lucky owner of this quilt, it was made as a wedding present for me and my husband.
    I had never dreamed of buying one before and to get it as a gift was amazing!
    It is cosy and soft and just like a warm cuddle around you, along with finishing our bedroom look to perfection. The finishing of it excellent and I know it will last for years. Thank you so much.
    Roll on winter so I can use it!

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